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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 14 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 10 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 9 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 26, 1862., [Electronic resource] 7 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 6 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 5 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 4 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 11, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Barry or search for Barry in all documents.

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was given, and two steam fire engines started for the conflagration, one of which was detained and turned back, and the other proceeded to the cue. The engine was quickly surrounded by a large crowd of soldiers, yelling like madmen, and swearing that they would not be interfered with. They were having a "nice little time of their own," and did not want to be interfered with — wanting no outsiders to spoil their fun. They commenced throwing stones, one of which struck and wounded severely Capt. Barry, of the engine, which was also injured by the missiles of the excited soldiery. The infuriated soldiers made a rush at the engineer, and tried to pull him off, and would have succeeded in this and their purpose of destroying the engine, but for the drivers, who lashed their horses through the crowd, succeeding in clearing them without further danger. On the way back, the engine and hose cart were met by another party of soldiers, who commenced to threaten but abstained from further demo