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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 54 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 24 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 12 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 13, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Liberia (Liberia) or search for Liberia (Liberia) in all documents.

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of practical men to slavery existing bounds, instead of suffering it to be spread over the whole unoccupied portion of this vast continent? Is it not favoring emancipation in the Federal district, to be accomplished at the Government's and without individual injustice or oppression! Does it not receive all who come into the Federal camps, to offer their services to the Union, and hold and protect them against disloyal claimants. Does it not favor the recognition of Hayti and Liberia! The that Mr. was required to give up his place because of his decided opposition to slavery is without foundation; that distinguished gentleman resigned his place only because his could be useful in a diplomatic situation, while the gentleman appointed his successor, it was expected, would be more efficient in administration. His successor has no more sympathy with slavery than Mr. Cameron. These and thoughts are a mun to you confidentially for such use in detail may be