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The Daily Dispatch: December 18, 1862., [Electronic resource], From Fredericksburg — the movements of the enemy. (search)
From Fredericksburg — the movements of the enemy. The news yesterday received from the recent field of battle fully confirms the statement of the withdrawal of the entire force of the enemy from the front of our lines, and leaves little doubt that his forces are seeking another point at which to make an attack. This movement by Burnside, we are satisfied, is well understood by our able commanding General, and will be met with that promptness which so effectually checked the enemy's advance at Fredericksburg on Saturday. Parties who left Summit Station yesterday represent that the enemy, in force, had been seen on the Northern side of the Rappahannock in King George county, nearly opposite Port Royal, and that the impression prevailed that they would attempt a passage of the river at that point, under cover of their gunboats. We are not sufficiently acquainted with the topography of that section to state whether or not it is favorable to their operations. The train whi
summit when required — Earthworks yet unfinished were completed, and aids from grand divisions were incessantly moving to and from headquarters. Doubleday's division of calm young veterans passed by here with faces unconscious of peril; and Burnside, in a short jacket, moved tranquilly in and out of his tent, with his hands in his pockets, as a man who had made all his dispositions, whose mind was easy, and who was confident of the results. Many orders indicative of action had been postponed in the Northern papers to be opposed to the issue of any more "greenbacks." The mother of Cardinal Antonelli is just dead, at the age of 90. Attempts are being made to get Lincoln to veto the bill admitting Western Virginia as one of the United States. Hon. S. S. Cox, of Ohio, gave a dinner to Gen. McClellan at Willard's, in Washington, on Friday. The young Napoleon toasted Burnside, wishing him all success. In New York, on Friday, gold was 131@132, and Virginia 6's 60.
Rumors from Kinston — movements of the enemy. Petersburg, Dec. 17. --There are rumors of heavy fighting all day near Kinston, but no particulars. During last week reinforcements were constantly being sent to Suffolk. The report was that Petersburg was to be attacked from Suffolk, while another force was to be landed at City Point, under protection of iron-clads. Since Burnside's defeat at Fredericksburg, it is believed the programme has been changed.
The effect of Burnside's defeat Petersburg, Dec. 17. --A lady who left Norfolk Monday has arrived here. The information of Burnside's defeat produced a most stunning effect on the Yankees at Norfolk, while our people were greatly elated. Yankee accounts say they were permitted to occupy Fredericksburg with but little opposition, but as soon as a large force got across the rebel Lee opened upon them with 250 pieces of artillery, while Stuart got partly into their rear and poured aBurnside's defeat produced a most stunning effect on the Yankees at Norfolk, while our people were greatly elated. Yankee accounts say they were permitted to occupy Fredericksburg with but little opposition, but as soon as a large force got across the rebel Lee opened upon them with 250 pieces of artillery, while Stuart got partly into their rear and poured a murderous fire into the Union ranks; that such havoc has not been seen since the war commenced. They report their loss in killed and wounded at 20,000.
The Daily Dispatch: December 18, 1862., [Electronic resource], From Fredericksburg — the movements of the enemy. (search)
Burnside's Whereabouts. At the time of writing this article, nothing has been heard of Burnside. It is probable that intelligence may be received of his movements during the day. With a river bBurnside. It is probable that intelligence may be received of his movements during the day. With a river between him and General Lee, which the latter has no means of crossing exactly at the point where he himself disappeared. It is easy for him to mask his movements for a short time. We may be certain,prisoners in our possession. They all concur in saying that the defeat was utter, and that had Burnside been a few miles further from his stronghold, his army must have been completely dispersed. Hiffairs." Indeed, it is rumored that on Saturday evening so tremendous had been the slaughter of Burnside's army that his men became unmanageable and positively refused to be led up again after the lasar more glorious than the most sanguine among us imagine. We shall never get at the truth, for Burnside will never tell it, and we have no means of ascertaining it independently of him. Our General i
o much as a "change of base." The first illustrates their superhuman valor; the last, their unapproachable generalship. Burnside has gratified them in both particulars. He came thundering down upon Fredericksburg like a thousand locomotives; he deps; nothing but the loss of his head will ever improve his heart. We are curious to see what will now be the fate of Burnside. The Fredericksburg route to Richmond was his pet scheme, and in this he had the emphatic approval of the Yankee Commanne for, Wonder what he was begun for." The manes of McClellan are now avenged. He was decapitated for not moving; Burnside avoided that error, and behold the result. The unfortunate Yankee Generals are between Seylla and Charybdis. If they stand still their own Government destroys them; if they don't stand still, they are destroyed by the Confederates. Burnside's next "onward movement" may be to New Jersey, that Botuny Bay of unfortunate Federal Generals. He said he was going to and t