Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 2, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Chase or search for Chase in all documents.

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st play, a melodrama, called "Leo, the Gipsey." In 1815 his tragedy of "Calus Gracehus" was produced at Belfast, and afterwards he wrote "William Tell" for Macready. His "Blind Beggar of Bethnal Green," produced in 1828, was a failure despite such an attractive Bass as Ellen Tree, and despite, too, the elaborate pains bestowed on the play by the disappointed author. He found ample future compensation for that and one or two other less complete failures in "Love," "The Hunchback," "The Love Chase," and "The Wife." The London Athenaeum, in a notice of the death of Knowles, thus describes his later years: If in some respects he was treated here as prophets are wont to be in their own country, and gentlemen are who, being heroes, are not so to their valets de chambers, beyond the Atlantic he had an ovation, which, however, would have been more valuable were it not that ovations are made there for the mediocrities of the hour as well as for the men whose names live. "Age g
hose who hall the return of Mr. Seward to the State Department as the salvation of the country ascribe the merit of the work which brought it about jointly to Secretary Chase and the President, Mr. Chase having sent in his resignation, is said to have firmly refused to withdraw it if Mr. Seward retired from the Cabinet. The PresidMr. Chase having sent in his resignation, is said to have firmly refused to withdraw it if Mr. Seward retired from the Cabinet. The President as firmly refused to accept the resignation of either. To Mr. Seward he said that, although his feelings and interests perhaps distasted his withdrew from the Cabinet at this juncture, patrician required him to stay and help him through his Administration; and as his in leaving would do. prive him of the services of a Secreermined to support. This was the spirit of the caucus as well as of the committee. What course the Republican Senators will take, now that Secretaries Seward and Chase have withdrawn their resignations, we have no means of knowing. It is not becoming that we publish the rumors in regard to them. But it is significant that all i