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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 102 102 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 46 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 34 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 34 34 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 33 33 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 21 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 20 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 5, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for 9th or search for 9th in all documents.

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y persons, a third of them women and children, could find nothing to live on there. He then said he would land them in Jamaica; for he was determined to barn the ship in revenge for Vanderbilt having given one of the finest steamers in the world to the Government to run him down. While the Ariel was deprived of her, steam valve, being without sails the could do nothing but drift about, and certainly could not escape. Therefore the Alabama could go off in search of other victims. On the 9th inst., at 9 o'clock P. M., the vessels arrived off Point Mordant, about forty miles from Kingston. Near this the Alabama gave chase and boarded a vessel, from which some information was received, which induced Capt. Semmes to again change his mind, and he permitted the Ariel to resume her voyage. The reason given was, that this vessel had reported yellow fever raging in Kingston, and he would not subject the passengers to its ravages; but the passengers were afterwards informed that no yellow