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The Daily Dispatch: January 22, 1863., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 22, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Job Stuart or search for Job Stuart in all documents.

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d, except the right wing, commanded by Bagration, and when that officer was slowly and steadily retiring before Lannes, Napoleon ordered Murat to charge him in flank with four thousand of d'hautpone's curassiers. The effect was instantaneous and decisive. At Jena, when the Prussian were retreating in something like order, he let loose Murat upon them with 12,000 cavalry and the retreat instantly became a flight. If Gen. Lee had such a body of cavalry always by him, under the command of Gen. Stuart, he might turn his next victory into the total destruction of the enemy. In the conscription, we believe, only infantry are selected. We should think that cavalry also should be conscribed and horses furnished them by the Government. For three or four millions of dollars, twenty thousand cavalry horses of good quality might be furnished, and it would be money well spent. It is too much to make the soldier furnish his own horse. It entails an expense which few are able to bear, an
The Daily Dispatch: January 22, 1863., [Electronic resource], A Yankee raid into Southwestern Virginia. (search)
A Musical raid Maker. --"Hermes," the Richmond correspondent of the Charleston Mercury, who can crowd as much readable matter in a short space as "any other man, " tells the following: Are your readers aware that Gen. Job Stuart carries with him wherever he goes, in all his circuits and raids, a brother of Joe Sweeney, the famous banjo player? Such is the fact. Sweeney is also a banjoist, and Stuart calls him his band.--He carries his banjo behind his saddle, wrapped up in a pieceamous banjo player? Such is the fact. Sweeney is also a banjoist, and Stuart calls him his band.--He carries his banjo behind his saddle, wrapped up in a piece of oil cloth, and whenever the cavalry stop, even to water their horses the band strikes up on the banjo and picks a merry air. The performance of the banjo band in Pennsylvania drove several Dutch farmers raving distracted, for Sweeney swore that his banjo strings were made out of the viscera of their departed relatives and friends!