Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 7, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Chase or search for Chase in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

In another article the same paper says that Congress has placed the finances of the country entirely in the hands of Secretary Chase. The amount of paper money we are about to have is $9,807,000,000. The best thing which can be said of this record is that we could not do otherwise under the circumstances. Chase started wrong, and should be attempt to float any of his bonds at present he would fail. Let him argue a few millions more of legal tenders first. But to achieve anything of real importance we must have military and naval successes. The sword must sustain the purse. * * * * The foundation of Chase's currency should have been taxation — it was legal tender notes. We knew the electricity which will reorganize our currency in o * * The foundation of Chase's currency should have been taxation — it was legal tender notes. We knew the electricity which will reorganize our currency in one simple word — victory. Chase has given us a system which is only adapted to succ
steam from the fleet, which locked as if they were all ready to start on a cruise. An occasional shot was fired during the night. The effort yesterday was no doubt for the purpose of obtaining the range of their guns. Miscellaneous items. The Washington correspondent of the New York Mercury telegraphs that there is to be a change in the Cabinet, and says the measure in view are-- First, a change in the Cabinet that will give Mr. Seward's policy a majority of the members. Mr. Chase is to be retained, or if he retired Hon. Robert J. Walker will take his place. Second, the restoration of Gen. McClellan to some command. Third, some concession to the negro prejudices of the Northern soldiers — blacks in the army to be kept in subordinate positions. Fourth, moderate Republicans and war Democrat to have the confidence of and the direction of the Administration. Fifth, there are to be no more arbitrary arrests except for very flagrant cases. In the Yankee House of