Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 14, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Hooker or search for Hooker in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 5 document sections:

The enemy in the Valley. A few days since we published a report which had reached us that the enemy were advancing up the Valley, and had even reached Harrisonburg, in Rockingham county. So far from this being correct, we are led by our latest information from that quarter to believe that the Valley is being evacuated, and that the forces under Milroy have either moved down to the Rappahannock to reinforce Hooker, or have been sent to the Northwest, with a view to check the operations of Gens. Jones and Imboden. The former we think most probable, as the Yankees are no doubt determined to make desperate efforts to recover the ground lost in the late battle of the Wilderness. At any rate, we think there can be little doubt that his force, variously estimated from 6,000 to 10,000 has nearly all left Winchester.
The Daily Dispatch: May 14, 1863., [Electronic resource], Richmond in possession of the Yankees. (search)
Richmond in possession of the Yankees. The New York World, of the 11th instant, contains the startling announcement that the Federal forces under Gen. Keyes had moved up from the Peninsula and captured the city of Richmond, and that "the national flag now floats over the Confederate Capitol." This remarkable feat was accomplished shortly after the battles on the Rappahannock, and before the rebels had recovered from the alarm occasioned by Stoneman's raid. Gen. Lee with his whole force, it was believed, would not be able to dislodge Keyes from the entrenchments which had fallen into the latter's hands without a struggle. What a glorious effect this astounding announcement will have on the Yankee nerve when taken in connection with the defeat of Hooker and his retreat to the north bank of the Rappahannock!
10th: During Wednesday and Thursday General Hooker detailed several regiments to gather up thhe roads but little progress was made, and General Hooker, on Friday, directed his attention to the ove account won't go down. The Herald on Hooker's retreat — what must be done. The New Yorking is an extract from it: The news of Gen. Hooker's retrograde move across the Rappahannock wry movement of our forces. It is said that Gen. Hooker was in a measure compelled to recross the rf the last ten days it is easy to see that General Hooker might have done better. For instance, hado late to be of any service to him. Or had General Hooker retained the powerful body of Stoneman's c no other defence against the testimony of General Hooker before the War Committee of Congress than he contrivers of this deplorable failure of Gen. Hooker, with the "finest army on the planet." Had ffolk, and of General Keyes, from Yorktown, Gen. Hooker might have enveloped the rebel army with hi[7 more...]
The Daily Dispatch: May 14, 1863., [Electronic resource], Richmond in possession of the Yankees. (search)
arranged that the prisoners should march down by land, taking the most available route. The distance thus was about 34 miles, and it was contemplated that the journey could be made by noon today. Sufficient rations were taken along in wagons to minister to the wants of the returning Yankees. The cavalcade was put in motion between 12 and 1 o'clock yesterday, the officers — about 250 in number — and over a thousand privates starting from the Libby prison and the balance joining them from Belle Isle after they crossed Mayo's bridge. It is understood that the Yankee Government had provided at City Point sufficient transportation for all the prisoners. They left Richmond in charge of Lieut. LaTouche. There are some 1,700 wounded Yankees still in field hospitals near the scene of the late engagement. These will be brought to Richmond and sent North as they shall recover. They are now attended by Yankee doctors and nurses, in pursuance of an agreement made by Hooker with Gen. Le
Governor Brown Chattanooga, May 11. --All quiet in front. No prospects of a battle. Andrew Johnson has been commissioned as Major-General in the Yankee army, with authority to organize a force of 5,000 Tennesseeans and ten thousand niggers. When one regiment of the latter has been organized, Williamson's cavalry will be disbanded. Bob Johnson, son of Andy, has been promoted to Brigadier. Ex-Governor Neil S. Brown, of Tenn., has come through the lines from Nashville, and is now at Pulaski. The Daily Press, of the 9th, contains a telegram relative to the late battles in Virginia. The loss of the Federals in Sedgwick's command alone, it says, was 5,000 men. In an editorial, the Press remarks that Hooker, having changed his base, tells the story that he was defeated. "Our first reports were base fabrications. " "The picture is frightful. It adds to the chronology of our sanguinary defeats in the East." The Press reports the "rebel" loss at ten to fifteen thousand.