hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 999 7 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 382 26 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 379 15 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 288 22 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 283 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 243 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 233 43 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 210 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 200 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 186 12 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 14, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Longstreet or search for Longstreet in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Yankee fabrications. The Yankees assert that Longstreet's corps was up from Suffolk in time to take part in the late battles. This is false, though we do not wonder that they thought the tremendous blow they received was dealt by Lee's whole army. Longstreet's corps did not come and was not needed. There was enough to whip the Yankees, and they may conclude from the past that there always will be enough of the right men in the right place. Yankee fabrications. The Yankees assert that Longstreet's corps was up from Suffolk in time to take part in the late battles. This is false, though we do not wonder that they thought the tremendous blow they received was dealt by Lee's whole army. Longstreet's corps did not come and was not needed. There was enough to whip the Yankees, and they may conclude from the past that there always will be enough of the right men in the right place.
els Gone?--This question is going around unanswered in the hotels to-day. It is the opinion of the military men that they have fallen back in two columns--one towards Richmond and another toward Gordonsville — in the hope of concentrating with Longstreet's forces in front of Richmond, once more to give us battle. The next engagement will take place most probably on or near the Upper Pamunkey river, whither General Hooker is moving as rapidly as possible. Many maintain that the James riverto raggedness when they effected their escape. Some of these soldiers were engaged in the recent battles, though they were taken as recently as Monday last. They were captured at or near Suffolk, and palpably straggled away purposely when Longstreet's corps retired from its position the day previous. They seem delighted to find themselves once more in the North, and are enjoying the panoramic display of Broadway with real zest. Miscellaneous. The subscriptions to the U. S., Nati