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Vicksburg. The news from the Southwest continues to be of the most cheering character. Nobly has General Pemberton vindicated the confidence placed in him by President Davis. From all accounts, the defence of Vicksburg is the most glorious episode in the already crowded annals of our military history. Hecatombs of Yankees attest the valor of our troops and the skill and success with which they have been handled in every attack. The heroic garrison has immortalized itself. The Yankeesair to prove by far the most dsiastrous and gigantic of all their failures in this war. The national craving for lies, which is so eminently characteristic of the Yankees, must have been hugely tickled by the announcement of the hanging of Pemberton by his own troops. This stunning piece of news, together with the no less veracious statement that Grant "has Vicksburg so hemmed in that the enemy cannot use his siege guns," cannot fail to recommend its author, Maj.-Gen. Augur, to the favor
The siege of Port Hudson will be raised. No doubts are felt in regard to the result. Interesting details of the light on Thursday at Vicksburg are coming on. Gen. Grant used cotton bales for moveable breastworks in the attack. Gen. Pemberton mounted 200 pounders and directed the fire at the cotton bales, mowing down whole platoons of the enemy. Official dispatches state that the enemy's loss was about forty thousand'! Our entire loss, including the action of Baker's Creek, d, including the action of Baker's Creek, does not exceed five thousand. Confidence in Gen. Pemberton since his answer to Grant's demand for a surrender has been fully restored. No fears are felt regarding the result either at Vicksburg or Port Hudson. [Third Dispatch.] Jackson, June 4. --P. M.--Heavy firing in the direction of Vicksburg has been heard all day. Nothing reliable has been received from there since Sunday. The weather is cloudy, and it is raining slightly.
General Pemberton to the army. --The Mississippian, of Saturday morning, publishes a speech made by Gen. Pemberton, after repulses of the enemy. It is as follows: You have heard that I was incompetent and a traitor, and that it was my intention to sell Vicksburg. Follow me, and you will see the cost at which I will selGen. Pemberton, after repulses of the enemy. It is as follows: You have heard that I was incompetent and a traitor, and that it was my intention to sell Vicksburg. Follow me, and you will see the cost at which I will sell Vicksburg. When the last pound of beef, bacon, and flour; the last grain of corn, the last cow, and hog, and horse, and dog, shall have been consumed, and the last man shall have perished in the trenches — then, and only then, will I sell Vicksburg. It is said that the tremendous repulse and slaughter of the Yankees at VicI sell Vicksburg. It is said that the tremendous repulse and slaughter of the Yankees at Vicksburg on Sunday was due to a stratagem of Gen. Pemberton, who made a feint of evacuating part of his works, when the enemy rushed in, only to be met with immense slaughter from artillery placed so as to take them with a raking fire-
Unionists had been repulsed with great slaughter. The dead were yet unburied, and becoming very offensive. Butterfield. An extra of the New Orleans Era of Sunday, the 24th, gives some of the Dutchman Augur's lying dispatches. The death of Gen. Pemberton is rather startling: Headq'rs U. S. Forces.Near Port Hudson, May 23. The following good news has just been received from Col. Grierson: We are half a mile north of the railroad. We have formed a junction with the forceo lines of the city defences, and his right now rests upon the Mississippi river, from whence her receives his supplies. Altogether, Gen. Grant has captured over one hundred pieces of artillery. Deserters and prisoners report that General Pemberton has been hanged by his own men. (Signed,)C. C. Augur. Resolutions of the New York State Democratic Committee. The State Democratic Committee of New York met at Albany on the 28th, and passed a series of resolutions. The first