Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Dix or search for Dix in all documents.

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Gen. Dix's Strategy. The movement of Gen. Dix by way of Bottom's Bridge was, it is now generally perceived, a feint. The appearance of his advance yesterday near the Hanover Junction developed his plan. We do not know whether or no our leaders foresaw it; but unlearned men predicted it. We shall soon know, however, whether the movement was anticipated and provided for. That we have the troops near this city to defeat the Yankees whenever they meet them we have no manner of doubt. It theGen. Dix by way of Bottom's Bridge was, it is now generally perceived, a feint. The appearance of his advance yesterday near the Hanover Junction developed his plan. We do not know whether or no our leaders foresaw it; but unlearned men predicted it. We shall soon know, however, whether the movement was anticipated and provided for. That we have the troops near this city to defeat the Yankees whenever they meet them we have no manner of doubt. It they are but brought front to front with them that is all they want. It is true that the Yankees never show an over-eagerness to meet our men, but we trust that they may be brought up to the fight. It would be a matter of deep regret if they are allowed to linger about this city destroying property and interrupting communication.
my ran off in great confusion, strewing the road with knapsacks, haversacks, blankets, oil cloths, and sabres. The prisoners stated that the number of troops under Dix was about 22,000. They think that there is not much fight in the troops. Two of them who arrived at the Libby prison say that the force which fought our troops nu army was marching on, but, from what they had heard their officers say, thought Richmond was to be taken. General Corcoran, with his force, from Suffolk, was with Dix. The train which came up on the York River Railroad yesterday afternoon brought the intelligence that there had been no fighting yesterday morning, and that tht laid off Fortress Monroe on Tuesday, and while there saw on board a Federal vessel an old acquaintance whom he had known, in Baltimore. The Federal told him that Dix had taken almost every man able to carry a musket on this expedition to Richmond, including Peck's troops, and that he had about 20,000 men. Some of the men belonge