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, on Friday evening, changed his front, and moved behind the town of Gettysburg, and on Saturday morning was in line of battle, expecting a renewal of the engagement. All the information received here comes through Maj. Hawks, of Ewell's command, who left Gettysburg on Saturday morning. He says that General Longstreet did not come up till very late, and I understood him to mean late on Fridays. Our loss on the two first days was not very great. On Friday our loss was heavy, especially in Pickett's division. Gens Barksdale and Garnett were killed. Gen. Trimble lost a leg and Gen. Hood an arm. Colonel Kanan, of North Carolinas, is severely wounded in the thigh. A train of wagons belonging to Longstreet, was, on yesterday, attacked by the enemy at Greencastle, and a large number captured, with their teams. It is strange to me that a single wagon should reach our army. They have been going sometimes without an escort, and when guarded the number of soldiers is too small for de
e that the officer from whom the above information was obtained was a very intelligent, cool, and deliberate person, and one not likely to exaggerate any fact which he might have learned. We last night conversed with two wounded soldiers of Pickett's division, who left Gettysburg at 12 o'clock on Saturday. They report that Pickett's division was with Longstreet in the centre, on Friday, and participated in the charge upon the heights. The charge resulted in a repulse, but nothing else. Pickett's division was with Longstreet in the centre, on Friday, and participated in the charge upon the heights. The charge resulted in a repulse, but nothing else. The enemy did not leave his fortified heights to try a battle in the field again that day. Our two informants, who were wounded, went back to their tents on the same ground they had occupied the night before, and the next day at noon were sent off to Martinsburg. They report the loss in the division as very heavy. The 1st Va., in Kemper's brigade, and the 14th Va., in Armistead's brigade, suffered heavily. Col. J. Gregory Hodges, of the latter regiment, one of the best and bravest officers o