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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 49 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 30 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 29 3 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 10 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 11, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Davidson or search for Davidson in all documents.

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gnize the bodies of the dead, carrying them to a convenient place, and laying them face to the enemy ready for burial. A skirmish. On Thursday morning the enemy opened an attack with cavalry, artillery, and infantry on our rear, and for a time there were some long faces, and the army was ordered under arms. A slight reconnaissance gave us information of the position and strength of the enemy, and showed that by a little adroitness we might capture the whole force. Accordingly, Gen. Davidson, with his brigade, proceeded to cut off the rebel force, and soon returned with six guns and some prisoners, the remainder making their escape. They were pursued some four miles. The success of this little skirmish had an electrical effect upon our men. The news was received with cheer after cheer, and the army stock immediately moved up one hundred per cent. Loss in killed, wounded and prisoners. A correspondent of the New York Times writes: In all the engagements, Mechan