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information we can gather, he has not now, and never has had, more than 60,000 men. We trust in God, then, that Gen. Johnston will take into consideration the great interests which are in his hands, and the utter loss of his military reputation that must inevitably follow a premature retreat from Jackson without offering some show of resistance to the enemy. To be sure it will be much more difficult to offer effectual resistance now than it would have been had he united in an attack with Pemberton and his eighteen or twenty thousand men. But there is still every reason to hope; if the commander will only lay aside his quiescent attitude and rouse himself to a true sense of his situation. In another quarter our affairs, so far from being in straits, are in the highest degree promising. General Lee gained a tremendous victory at Gettysburg. Of that we cannot see the slightest reason to doubt. He took 15,000 or 18,000 prisoners, and he has secured them all. He fell back purely
city, they had been living on mule meat and bread made of peas; and yet, he added, if it had been known that relief would have come they would still have held out. The privates who have arrived at Jackson Miss., speak in the highest terms of Gen. Pemberton. They say they went into the fortifications prejudiced against him, but that no man could have done more to defend the city than he did. It is stated by officers that all the officers in the city concurred in advising Pemberton to surrender.e fortifications prejudiced against him, but that no man could have done more to defend the city than he did. It is stated by officers that all the officers in the city concurred in advising Pemberton to surrender. About 200 of the paroled prisoners, including Brig, Gen. Stephen D. Lee, have arrived at Jackson. The Yankees were led to believe that if they took Vicksburg the war was ended, and they could all go home, and they would remark to our troops, "well, boys, we can all go home now.".
s of truce appeared before A. J. Smith's front, when Major-Gen. Bowen and Col. Montgomery were led blindfolded into our lines. They bore a communication from Gen. Pemberton of the following purport: "Although I feel confident of my ability to resist your arms indefinitely, in order to stop the further effusion of blood, I pe distinguished gallantry with which the defence of Vicksburg has been conducted." At 11 o'clock the messengers returned. This afternoon Gen. Grant met Gen. Pemberton between the lines, and after an hour's consultation settled the surrender. Gen. Pemberton urged that the soldiers might be paroled here and furnished rationsGen. Pemberton urged that the soldiers might be paroled here and furnished rations to carry them to their lines; in view of the bravery they have displayed and the advantages of the plan, Gen. Grant will consent. The number of prisoners, wounded, &c., it is said, will be 18,000, of which 12,000 are in fighting condition now. The immediate cause of surrender is exhaustion of supplies and ammunition, and the