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s of the garrison. [Approved,] N. P. Banks, Maj.-Gen., [Approved,] Frank Gardner, Maj.-Gen. The Armies of Gens. Meade and Lee--the coming campaign in Virginia. A dispatch, dated the 21st at Hagerstown, Md., reports General Lee to beis an extract from it: The information which we, as yet, have both as regards Lee's position and line of retreat, and Meade's line of advance, is too scanty to enable one to forecast the nature of the coming campaign. The character of the greathing by way of Berlin, Wheatland, and Warrenton, have a direct line. Lee has two sides of a great triangle to describe. Meade has but one. Previous to the inauguration of the campaign last autumn it was an anxious inquiry with Gen. McClellan e rebels occupying the line of the Rappahannock. This line, synonymous with three disastrous failures, we presume, Gen. Meade will avoid altogether. It should never have been chosen. By moving from Warrenton direct on Culpeper C. H. he takes t
The Daily Dispatch: July 27, 1863., [Electronic resource], Meade's Boasting — official Dispatch from Gen. Lee. (search)
Meade's Boasting — official Dispatch from Gen. Lee. The following dispatch from Gen. Lee was received at the War Department Saturday: Headq'rs Army Northern Va., 21st July, 1863. Gen. S. Cooper, Adj't and Insp'r Gen'l, C. S. A., Richmond, Va: General --I have seen in Northern papers what purported to be an official dispatch from Gen. Meade, stating that he had captured a brigade of infantry, two pieces of artillery, two caissons, and a large number of small arms, as this armGen. Meade, stating that he had captured a brigade of infantry, two pieces of artillery, two caissons, and a large number of small arms, as this army retired to the South bank of the Potomac, on the 13th and 14th insts. This dispatch has been copied into the Richmond papers, and as its official character may cause it to be believed, I desire to state that it is incorrect. The enemy did not capture any organized body of men on that occasion, but only stragglers and such as were left asleep on the road, exhausted by the fatigue and exposure of one of the most inclement nights I have ever known at this season of the year. It rained with