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The Daily Dispatch: September 2, 1863., [Electronic resource], The capture of gunboats on the Rappahannock. (search)
pon by mistake from battery Bee and sunk. Several were killed, wounded or drowned. [third Dispatch.] Charleston, Aug. 31, P. M. --About noon to-day two monitors approached and opened fire on Sumter. They were soon driven off by Fort Moultrie and battery Gregg. At 2 o'clock P. M. all the monitors stood in close to Sumter, firing briskly at the sea face of the fort, and also at Fort Moultrie and battery Gregg. For an hour the fight was very severe. Moultrie and Sullivan'Fort Moultrie and battery Gregg. For an hour the fight was very severe. Moultrie and Sullivan's Island batteries fired very rapidly. Soon after three o'clock the monitors withdrew, some of them having been struck frequently. Occasional firing from the land batteries is heard to-night. [fourth Dispatch.] Charleston, S. C., Sept. 1. --All quiet this morning. [Fifth Dispatch.] Charleston, Sept. 1.--P. M. --The firing this afternoon has been slow, the fleet not participating. The land batteries are firing at Sumter, which holds out gallantly. But little
The siege of Charleston. --The Charleston Courier, of Saturday, has the following about the siege of that city: The artillery fire continued Thursday night without intermission. On Friday morning Fort Moultrie opened an effective fire for about an hour on the enemy's rifle-pits and lower batteries on Morris Island. Batteries Cheves, Haskell, and Simpkins, on James Island, also continued to pour in a heavy and well-directed fire on the Yankee works on Morris Island. Early in the morning the enemy opened a steady fire upon battery Wagner from his stockade defences in front of Yankee battery No. 2, and continued it throughout the day. A slow and irregular fire was also kept up against Fort Sumter with little effect. In the afternoon battery Simpkins opened fire on a party of Yankees discovered working on a new fortification near the rifle-pits, causing a stampede among them and driving them from their works. From twenty to thirty shells struck directly in the vici