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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 5 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 18 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 18 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 28, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Wharton or search for Wharton in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: October 28, 1863., [Electronic resource], Narrative of Wheeler's Circuit around Rosecrans. (search)
ces lifeless, hanging in the dense cedar brakes. Scattered through the fields and woodlands were seen our soldiers making their way to their commands, many of whom escaped in the confusion, after being captured. At Farmersville we joined Gen. Wharton's and Martin's divisions, with Gen. Wheeler. These were speedily formed in line of battle to await the enemy's approach. In a few minutes they made their appearance, and, confident of success, moved boldly to the attack. Gen. Wheeler had here ambushed a portion of Wharton's division. The enemy was speedily and severely repulsed and driven back. Reinforcing, they soon forced back both of these splendid divisions. Night coming on closed the engagement. The battle was a severe one, in which many were killed and wounded on both sides. After this there was but little skirmishing until at Sugar Creek a severe engagement occurred, in which the rear guard of the corps, the 2d Georgia and a Kentucky battalion, fragments of Morgan