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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 692 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 516 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 418 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 358 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 230 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 190 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 186 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 182 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 31, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for France (France) or search for France (France) in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: October 31, 1863., [Electronic resource], Release of Rev. Mr. Gibson, of Baltimore. (search)
sfaction of being put out of our suspense, and of entitling ourselves to the blessings of those "who expect nothing, for they shall not be disappointed." We are a young nation, unused to the tricks of European diplomacy, and may be pardoned for our juvenile greenness in believing that England, having instigated for many years the dissensions and division of the American Union, and having such large interests in the manufacture of cotton, would hasten to acknowledge our independence, and that France, which cooperates with England in all great enterprises, would not be far behind. Being now happily free from these illusions, we hope never to hear the word "European Intervention," or any other word which implies dependence on any one but ourselves. We have only one favor to ask of England, and that is to abstain from informing us by every mail that she has no idea of intervention. Her journals and public men have a habit of repetition upon this as well as other subjects which does not