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The Daily Dispatch: November 12, 1863., [Electronic resource] 23 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 12, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for H. Ward Beecher or search for H. Ward Beecher in all documents.

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ill he stopped by the French Government. Beecher in England — Scenes at his Necturus. Rev.Rev. H. Ward Beecher at Exacter Hall was the excitement in London on the 23d ult. A correspondent of a Nt, "noise and confusion" which had attended Mr. Beecher's public appearance in Liverpool, where thent posters, quoting from former speeches of Mr. Beecher and denouncing President Lincoln, Gen. Butler, &c. Mr. Beecher's saying that the hest blood of England must alone for the affair of the Trent,fashion. No use. The people wished to hear Mr. Beecher and nobody else. They drowned out or dried up the domestic orator, and Mr. Beecher took the platform. Then came an uproar. A storm of cheerthe hissers, the contest was soon over, and Mr. Beecher made an able address of more than two hourspendence. You will see that it was putting Mr. Beecher in a rather right place. He got out of it all the charm of novelty. "This true," said Mr. Beecher, (of course I do not give his words,) "that
One of Beecher's Heasphenies. --Mr. Beecher was feted to the last moment by his friends and admirers in England. He assured a large body of dissenting clergymen in London that he believed a sore throat, which he brought from the Continent to that city, was cured by " divine interposition," so that he could speak in Exeter Hall. One of Beecher's Heasphenies. --Mr. Beecher was feted to the last moment by his friends and admirers in England. He assured a large body of dissenting clergymen in London that he believed a sore throat, which he brought from the Continent to that city, was cured by " divine interposition," so that he could speak in Exeter Hall.