Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 9, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for December 8th or search for December 8th in all documents.

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From Charleston. Charleston, Dec. 8. --No firing last night. A brisk fire between Fort Moultrie and Battery Gregg was opened this morning. Nothing else new. [second Dispatch.] Charleston, Dec. 8. --The Yankees have ceased firing on Sumter. They are riveting their batteries, and also appear to be entrenching Gregg eastward. During the late blow the pitching of one of the monitors revealed some timber work built around her sides, supposed to be rafts to protect her from t Fort Moultrie and Battery Gregg was opened this morning. Nothing else new. [second Dispatch.] Charleston, Dec. 8. --The Yankees have ceased firing on Sumter. They are riveting their batteries, and also appear to be entrenching Gregg eastward. During the late blow the pitching of one of the monitors revealed some timber work built around her sides, supposed to be rafts to protect her from torpedoes. Our batteries keep up a slow but constant fire on the enemy's working pariles.
Movements of the enemy in East Tennessee. Dalton, Dec. 7. --The Yankee prisoners captured near Charleston and Cleveland reached here to-day. Six of them comprised a picket of the enemy's rear guard. Our troops passed through Cleveland twelve hours after the enemy's supply trains, which was twelve miles in rear of their army. Two of the enemy's corps had passed through Cleveland and Georgetown, en route for Knoxville. Their advance had reached Loudoun. Reports from Knoxville are conflicting. The enemy are laying waste the country in their line of march. [second Dispatch.] Dalton, Dec. 8. --The enemy's cavalry appeared yesterday at Ringgold; but being attacked by our forces under Col. Grigsby, were routed and driven a mile beyond the town. No casualties on our side.
The siege of Knoxville. Bristol, Dec. 8. --The siege of Knoxville was raised on Friday night, our forces falling back slowly to Morristown, where a stand will probably be made. The work of putting the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad in running order to that point will be pushed forward by Col. Owen, of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, who is entrusted with it. Our entire loss around Knoxville will not exceed 600, principally of Hood's division. Among them are Colonel Ruff, 18th Ga., killed; Col. Fifer, 18th Miss., seriously wounded, and Captain Dunn, of Longstreet's staff, wounded in the leg. The assault on the 29th failed, it is said, in consequence of forged orders, recalling Anderson's brigade.