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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 273 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 109 5 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 74 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 74 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 68 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 38 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 34 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 9, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) or search for Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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of the gallant stormers escaped." The fighting is represented as desperate, but was over by sunrise. Gen. Burnside offered them an armistice from 10 A. M. to 5 P. M. to bury their dead, which was accepted. The Yankees state the Confederate loss at 1,000 killed and wounded, 250 prisoners, and 3 flags. Their own loss is put at 80. Col. Girarde, of the 13th Mississippi, was killed, and Lt. Col. O'Brien, brother of Mrs. Brownlow, is a prisoner. The N. Y. Tribune says: "Advices from Cumberland Gap to the 3d inst. say that Gen. Foster had driven the rebels under Longstreet from Clinch river, and was in hot pursuit of them. There was little hope felt, however, that the enemy would fail to make good his retreat, as our forces were checked on Wednesday and a wide distance put between the armies. The column sent to the relief of Gen. Burnside is under the command of Gen. Sherman, whose force is pretty certain by this time to have reached Knoxville." The retreat of Meade across
ender of battle.--On more than one occasion the enemy has since made demonstrations of a purpose to advance, invariably followed by a precipitate retreat to entrenched lines on the approach of our forces. The effective check thus offered to the advance of the invaders at all points, was such as to afford hope of their early expulsion from portions of the territory previously occupied by them, when the country was painfully surprised by the intelligence that the officer in command of Cumberland Gap had surrendered that important and easily defensible pass without firing a shot, upon the summons of a force still believed to have been inadequate to its reduction, and when reinforcements were within supporting distance and had been ordered to his aid. The entire garrison, including the commander, being still held prisoners by the enemy, I am unable to suggest any explanation of this disaster, which laid open Eastern Tennessee and Southwestern Virginia to hostile operations, and broke