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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 9, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 2 document sections:

Movements of the enemy in East Tennessee. Dalton, Dec. 7. --The Yankee prisoners captured near Charleston and Cleveland reached here to-day. Six of them comprised a picket of the enemy's rear guard. Our troops passed through Cleveland twelve hours after the enemy's supply trains, which was twelve miles in rear of their army. Two of the enemy's corps had passed through Cleveland and Georgetown, en route for Knoxville. Their advance had reached Loudoun. Reports from Knoxville are conflicting. The enemy are laying waste the country in their line of march. [second Dispatch.] Dalton, Dec. 8. --The enemy's cavalry appeared yesterday at Ringgold; but being attacked by our forces under Col. Grigsby, were routed and driven a mile beyond the town. No casualties on our side.
I am unable to suggest any explanation of this disaster, which laid open Eastern Tennessee and Southwestern Virginia to hostile operations, and broke the line of communication between the seat of Government and Middle Tennessee. This easy success of the enemy was followed by an advance of Gen'l Rosecrans into Georgia, and our aand in Northern Virginia. The combined forces thus accumulated against us in Tennessee so greatly outnumbered our army as to encourage the enemy to attack. After aime the army of Gen'l Burnside was driven from all its field positions in Eastern Tennessee, and forced to retreat into its entrenchments at Knoxville, where, for so his further progress has been checked. If we are forced to regret losses in Tennessee and Arkansas, we are not without ground for congratulation on success in Loui. These laws were passed in May, and the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas having joined the Confederacy, the Congress adjourned to meet i