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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 191 93 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 185 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 182 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 156 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 145 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 128 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 106 18 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 103 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 84 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 80 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 9, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) or search for Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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ch they inaugurated the war, and that the exchange of prisoners has been for some time suspended. The correspondence of the Commissioners of Exchange is submitted to you by the Secretary of War, and it has already been published for the information of all now suffering useless imprisonment. The conduct of the authorities of the United States has been consistently perfidious on this subject.--An agreement for exchange in the incipiency of the war had just been concluded when the fall of Fort Donelson reversed the previous state of things, and gave them an excess of prisoners. The agreement was immediately repudiated by them, and so remained till the fortune of war again placed us in possession of the larger number. A new cartel was then made, and under it, for many mouths, we restored to them many thousands of prisoners in excess of those whom they hold for exchange, and encampments of surplus paroled prisoners delivered up by us were established in the United States, where the men