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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 11, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Meade or search for Meade in all documents.

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Matters in Northern Virginia. There was no news received yesterday from Northern Virginia. A report was circulated during the day that a fleet of Yankee transports were in the Potomac, and that Gen. Meade had gone to Washington to consult with reference to the transfer of the Yankee army of the Potomac from the line of the Rappahannock to the Peninsula or South side. This report doubtless has its origin in the appearance of the Russian fleet, which was recently at New York, in the waters of the Potomac. This fleet is understood to be moving up that stream with a view of paying a visit to the capital of the Abolition Government.
The Daily Dispatch: December 11, 1863., [Electronic resource], Ravages of the enemy when last this side of the Rapidan. (search)
Ravages of the enemy when last this side of the Rapidan. After Meade's army had crossed at Germanns and Ely's fords they subjected the unfortunate farmers within their lines to the most inhuman treatment. They burned the house of Mr. Reuben Gordon, son of Ger. Wm. F. Gordon, because, as they said, he was an original Secessioemember the gallant Kilpatrick and his men, and their conduct in Gloucester, Middlesex, the Northern Neck, and Spotsylvania. Some of the prisoners taken said that Meade gave them their choice between re-enlisting for three years or going across the Rapidan and fighting Lee. They chose the latter. Meade has assured them that he wilesex, the Northern Neck, and Spotsylvania. Some of the prisoners taken said that Meade gave them their choice between re-enlisting for three years or going across the Rapidan and fighting Lee. They chose the latter. Meade has assured them that he will get a fight out of them before next May, when their term of service expires.
re intentions, at least for the winter. As he cannot advance in the direction of Rome during the winter months, so he cannot move by this route without the aid of the railroad which he has been destroying. This may be a ruse, however, intended to throw us off our guard until he can accumulate supplies and transportation for a forward movement. It has been suggested that the Federal plans may embrace an advance upon Virginia through Bast Tennessee, and a junction of the armies of Grant and Meade under the walls of Richmond. But such an undertaking is hardly practicable, especially in midwinter. It is more probable that heavy demonstrations will be made in the direction of Knoxville, with a view to frightening Longstreet from his pray; and it may be that a reinforcing column will be sent to the relief of Burnside. Indeed, our cavalry scouts report that forces are already in motion for that destination, having, at last accounts, reached the neighborhood of Charleston. Nothing
From General Lee's army. [from our Own Correspondent.] Army of Northern Virginia, Near Orange C. H., Dec. 8, 1863. The situation seems to be this: Meade finding himself unable to force General Lee back towards Richmond by a mere display in his front, has retired certainly behind the Rapidan, and report says he is tearing go behind the Rappahannock to winter his army. Our army is in its old position and preparing comfortable quarters for the winter, if, indeed, Generals Lee and Meade shall permit them. The roads, however, are now as hard as pavements and the weather though quite cold has been clear for the last few days, and the winds have bee, besides many of the private soldiers. Dr. Wilmer frequently visits the army, and his sermons are always productive of good. Our captures in prisoners since Meade first began his forward movement will amount to eight hundred, which will in some measure compensate for the losses at Rappahannock bridge. To-day some fifty