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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 168 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 135 15 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 133 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 88 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 81 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 74 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 61 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 41 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 36 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 35 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Sedgwick or search for Sedgwick in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 1 document section:

ement, and in nothing more than in the great rapidity with which it was executed; and thirdly, because of the failure of Sedgwick to unite with Hooker. If Sedgwick had crossed at Fredericksburg on Friday, and carried the heights on Saturday, I belieSedgwick had crossed at Fredericksburg on Friday, and carried the heights on Saturday, I believe the results might have been very different. But whilst our success was very great, still the failure to capture Sedgwick at Banks's ford on Monday evening, May 4th, was as inexcusable as I believe the surrender into our hands of the whole of HooSedgwick at Banks's ford on Monday evening, May 4th, was as inexcusable as I believe the surrender into our hands of the whole of Hooker's force at Chancellorsville would have been inevitable but for the wound Gen. Jackson received on Saturday evening. It is strange that Hooker, having planned so well, should have allowed his grand schemes to fall by such blunders as detaching his cavalry and the want of cooperation by Sedgwick. Besides the prisoners captured at Chancellorsville, we obtained not less than thirty thousand small arms, and some artillery, whilst the field was literally covered with blankets and overcoats, too f