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Grant the furlough. --A Mrs. Howard, of Russell co., Ala., learning that there was an order granting a furlough for the husbands and friends of ladies who should cause to be arrested any deserter from our army, succeeded, on Tuesday last, in having two deserters from the army at Savannah arrested, and we learn they are now held in custody by Major Howard's battalion. Mrs. Howard's husband is in the army at Charleston, and she claims a furlough for him. We do not know that there is any such order on record, but sincerely hope this lady will have a furlough granted her husband, who, we learn, is a good soldier, and has not seen his family in a great whMrs. Howard's husband is in the army at Charleston, and she claims a furlough for him. We do not know that there is any such order on record, but sincerely hope this lady will have a furlough granted her husband, who, we learn, is a good soldier, and has not seen his family in a great while. Should she thus be encouraged we shall soon expect to hear of many more wives engaging in the same noble work.--Columbus (Ga) Times.
st them as one man.--Would we not think it hard that old Virginia should be stigmatized for the acts of these her degenerate children — children whom she would scorn to own, and of whose deeds she would be deeply ashamed? There is no Virginian who would not protest against any judgment found against his State upon testimony such as this. Yet this is precisely the testimony upon which Maryland has been judged. The Plug Ugly and the Blood Tub are taken as types of that race from whom sprang Howard, Williams, and Smith, in the war of the old Revolution — whose fathers fought by the side of ours at Guilford, at Camden, at Ninety Six, and at Eutaw — whose institutions are the same with our own, and of whose sons many have laid down their lives since this war began, fighting in this cause, which is theirs as well as ours. When the conscript law was on its passage in the spring of 1862, the most prominent among the Marylanders who resided among as desired its provisions to embrace all<
The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1864., [Electronic resource], The contemplated attack on Wilmington. (search)
For hire --Low, if a good home be secured, a first-rate female cook. Apply at the City Hall, to Ro Howard. [ja 12--3t+]