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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 98 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 78 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 60 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 46 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 40 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 36 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 36 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 32 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 28 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 30, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Preussen or search for Preussen in all documents.

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Reserve force. It is clear enough to ordinary capacities that the only military use which can be made of boys of sixteen and men over forty-five is to organize them under State legislation into home guards, for the defence against raids of the various counties and localities in which they reside. As for any light which military experience sheds upon the subject, we are entirely in the dark, as we are not aware that any nation has ever before attempted such an experiment. --Even Prussia, when sorely beleaguered by her foes, did not call into the field men over the age of forty-five. Such a call would only have resulted in the wholesale death, by exposure, of men whose declining years and physical infirmities rendered them totally incapable of enduring the hardships of camp life. The impolite of such an enterprise is heightened by the necessity of this class of the population to the production of supplies, too limited even now for the demands of the army, and by its encouraging
the Statistical Bureau of the French Ministry of Agriculture, Commerce and Public Works. He says: Austria keeps up an army of 467,000 men, which costs her 336,000,000 francs; France an army of 573,000 men, which costs 688,000,000 francs; Prussia an army of 214,000 men. which costs her 156,000,000 francs: England an army of 300,000 men, which costs 677,000,000 francs; and Russia an army of 1,000,000 of men, which costs 529,000,000 francs. That is, out of the total budget of each of those States, an expenditure of 37 per cent, in Austria, or more than a third; 33 per cent, in France; 30 in Prussia; 39 in England; and 42 in Russia. Let us also mention Italy, where 320,000,000 francs are expended in keeping up a force of 314,000 men; Turkey, weighed down by an army of 44,000 men; Denmark and Sweden, the first with 50,000 and the second with 67,000 men, by which their budgets are increased to 37 and 40 per cent, respectively. The other secondary States follow in an analogous pr