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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,742 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 1,016 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 996 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 516 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 274 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 180 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 164 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 142 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 3, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Alabama (Alabama, United States) or search for Alabama (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Confederate States . The yesterday was opened with prayer by the T. V. Moore, of the Presbyterian Church. A communication was received, enclosing by company B, 20th. Alabama artillery, re-enlisting for the war, and recommending that a re-election of officers will continue to the greater efficiency of the . The communication was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Sparrow from the Military Committee, reported back late the bill to established a polytechnics, which was ordered to be printed. Mr. Sparrow, from the same committee, reported back adversely the memorial of Alfred L Mann and others. Also, the bill to punish absence from the army. Mr. Sparrow, from the same committee, reported back, with the recommendation that he concurred in, the House Joint thanks to Capt. Odium, Lieut. and the ferry one men under their command, for their skill and gallantry . Pass on the 8th September, The resolution was unanimously House bills were appropri
to be that the supply was inexhaustible. It had been fortunate for the Confederacy if the authorities, both civil and military, and sooner appreciated the value of an able bodied man and a good horse. In a country like ours, bounded on one side by a cordon of States, and shut out on the other by a blockade which effectually prevents us from recruiting our wasted armies from other parts of the world, the worth of a capable soldier or horse is incalculable. But the authorities have at last taken a step in the right direction. them follow it up by establishing other infirmaries at points where, as at this, there is an abundant supply of corn and forage. There should a feast be one in the Trans-Mississippi Department another in Alabama, and another in North Carolina. Without the horse, we can neither grow provisions for the army, nor move its supplies, nor keep proper watch upon the enemy what further motive does a sagacious and patriotic Government require? Sallust.
The Daily Dispatch: February 3, 1864., [Electronic resource], Murders by the Federate in North Alabama. (search)
Murders by the Federate in North Alabama. --In the Rome Courtier we find the annexed account of outrages lately committed by the Federal in North Alabama: Ben. Harris, of Madison county. Ala., has recently shown the effects of Yankee associations on disposition and morality. He joined the Federal soon after they first came into that section and has recently shown what progress he has made in crime and bloodshed. We learn the following foots from a gentleman just from Marshall cNorth Alabama: Ben. Harris, of Madison county. Ala., has recently shown the effects of Yankee associations on disposition and morality. He joined the Federal soon after they first came into that section and has recently shown what progress he has made in crime and bloodshed. We learn the following foots from a gentleman just from Marshall county. On Christmas day Ben. Harris headed a bloody gang of some twenty Yankees belonging to the 4th Ohio cavalry and came down into Madison county where he knew all the people and showed how much like a fiend a traitor may become. Benj. Roden, Porter Roden, also James Roden and his son, Theophilus R. and Wm. Hardcastle, were all on Buck 1st and, five miles above Guntersville, tending to their horses, when Harris and his delectable party came upon them. They were all unarmed and surrendered