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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 1,857 43 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 250 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 242 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 138 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 129 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 126 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 116 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 116 6 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 114 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 89 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 15, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for John Brown or search for John Brown in all documents.

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the character of this contest as waged by the North, and the character of the people by whom it is waged, than Gen. Jackson. He looked upon it as essentially a John Brown raid, headed by a man who resembled John Brown in everything but courage. If the perpetrators of the John Brown raid deserved death, so did the Black RepublicaJohn Brown in everything but courage. If the perpetrators of the John Brown raid deserved death, so did the Black Republican gang who took up their enterprise, almost on the spot where they atoned for it with their lives. If there was any difference in the criminality of the enterprise, it was not in favor of Lincoln and his Myrmidons, who had in view the same objects of universal devastation and robbery, hid under the convenient pretext of vindicating the laws, and who committed outrages at the very start more hideous and abominable than any John Brown ever proposed. Gen. Jackson, we say, thoroughly understood the purpose of this war, and the character of the people by whom it is carried on. The confiscation acts of Congress, the proclamation of Lincoln, and the legal e