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Latest from Knoxville. --Gen. Longstreet is still crowding the enemy towards Knoxville, as also towards another important point. The Bristol Gazette, of the 11th, obtains the following items from Capt. Kain, who gathers them from persons just from and near Knoxville: The Federals are again exercising their cruelly to the defenceless citizens. Among the recent arrests are the Rev. Jos. Martin, Chas. M. McGhee, Columbus Powell, and R. M. McPherson. They are all confined in jail. The purpose of this arrest is, without doubt, to afford their plundering bands a better opportunity to despoil the sufferers of all their portable property. Messrs McGhee and Powell, it will be recollected, was sometime since arrested under orders from General Burnside and transported to Kentucky, where, after being robbed of several thousand dollars, they were discharged, and permitted to return to their homes. The Yankees have completed the Knoxville and Kentucky Railroad to the Clinch ri
The Daily Dispatch: February 15, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Capture by Gen. Martin's expedition. (search)
The Capture by Gen. Martin's expedition. --When the attack was made on Newbern an expedition was sent out from Wilmington, under Gen. Martin, to make a demonstration against Fort Anderson. A letter in the Wilmington Journal gives the results of the expedition: Altogether, our troops captured seven pieces of artillery, several hundred stand of arms, two hundred boxes of ammunition, about seventy five prisoners, six slaves, a dozen horses, and commissary stores enough to subsist the Gen. Martin, to make a demonstration against Fort Anderson. A letter in the Wilmington Journal gives the results of the expedition: Altogether, our troops captured seven pieces of artillery, several hundred stand of arms, two hundred boxes of ammunition, about seventy five prisoners, six slaves, a dozen horses, and commissary stores enough to subsist the troops during their stay in the neighborhood, besides a large quantity of clothing with which our men supplied themselves — such as overcoats, pants, blankets, &c. The enemy burnt most of their quartermaster and commissary stores. They also burnt their stables with the horses in them. Some few horses were rescued by our men. In addition to our captures, we destroyed one thousand barrels of turpentine belonging to the U S government and burnt two railroad bridges.