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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 166 56 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 114 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 98 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 91 9 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 78 2 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 77 7 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 58 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 45 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 7, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Hardee or search for Hardee in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: March 7, 1864., [Electronic resource], The question of Exchange — arrival of Confederate prisoners from Point Look out. (search)
the enemy's hospitality and become a prisoner of war. In speaking of the manner in which the Confederate forces were handled in the fight, the same correspondent says: The rebel forces were skillfully hundred, and they came into the fight in admirable order, and fought with great energy and valor. They were probably veteran troops from Savannah and Charleston, and other camps in Georgia. It is impossible to say who commanded them, but presumed to be Gens. Grimer or Mercer. Lieut. Gen. Hardee was known to be at Lake City a week ago, and it is possible that he might have been in command or present at the battle. For this disaster poor Seymour has fallen under the ban, and one report says that Gillmore has placed him under arrest. The New York Post, in commenting upon the Florida disaster, says: We hope General Gillmore will now see the mistake he made in taking General Seymour with him to the Department, of the South, from which he had just before been sent away