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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 10 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 11, 1862., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 10 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 12, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Alexander or search for Alexander in all documents.

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cannot reach Great Britain. As might have been expected, the same man who is a truculent bully to a helpless State is the most abject of cowards to such States as can help themselves. We say nothing of the United States. The whole world has seen the papers published by the Yankee Congress, in which Seward figures as the dictator, and Russell as the cringing and subservient tool. Look at the continent of Europe. Russell pretends to intercede for the Poles, and he is told at once by Alexander to shut his month and attend to his own business. Russia wants none of his interference. He induces the Danes — whom England has cruelly injured on more than one occasion — to raise their crest against Austria and Prussia. When he remonstrates and "represents," these two Powers treat her with the most sovereign contempt. --They laugh at his remonstrances, and defy him to do their worst. The Yankees, the Prussians, the Russians, and the Austrians, all, have taken measure of the man. The
From East Tennessee. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Camp near Midway Depot,Tennessee, March 7th, 1864. As much has been said about re-enlistments, it may be proper to state that in this battalion, (Alexander's,) sicklin's Battery, (S. C.) re-enlisted in December, last Jordan's early in January, and Parker's more recently, though the first enlistment of three years has not yet expired. It is quite certain that the other battalions will re-enlist, if they have not yet done, so. I have heard many men not remarkable for spirit, say that as they have gone this far, they wish to see the "feel if it." There is a species of curiosity about that sort of patriotism not altogether unnatural. Longstreet's falling back a little last week was not because he had the fear of the Yankees "he fore his eyes." He can advance when he feels disposed. There is not as much disloyally in this part of the State as is represented. There who belong to this class are such men as