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The Daily Dispatch: March 24, 1864., [Electronic resource], Proclamation by the President of the Confederate States of America. (search)
The next Yankee Presidency. We take the following extracts from our late Northern files about the next Yankee Presidency. The New York Herald says: Mr. Chase has withdrawn from the field as a Presidential candidate for 1864. His patriotism, we are told, would not permit him to continue before the country as an aspirant for the succession, in view of the necessity of harmony and cohesion among the rank and file of the Administration party; but it appears, nevertheless, that his retirement from the contest with "Old Abe" is due to the discovery that Mr. Chase could not command a majority of his party even in the Ohio Legislature against "Old Abe." Assuming that this news of the backing out of the head of the Treasury is true, we may conclude that he and all his financial power will now be thrown into the seated of President Lincoln. But there is yet another Richmond in the field in the person of Gen. Fremont. Against Abraham Lincoln he stands somewhat in the positi
The Daily Dispatch: March 24, 1864., [Electronic resource], Proclamation by the President of the Confederate States of America. (search)
continue to pay up their balance in hard money. Nor is this the most serious drain upon them, as would be found if the veil of private transactions between the Northern and European ports — or Northern merchants and foreign bankers — could be lifted. It would be found that hundreds and thousands of shoddy and other sharpers who have amassed fortunes out of the war have made and are now making special deposits in safe places beyond the Atlantic which must come upon the Yankee nation. If Mr. Chase were to-morrow to let out his $30,000,000 of gold in Wall street, in order to reduce the premium on gold and temporarily to bolster up the credit of the Yankee Government, the greater part of it, if not the whole, would find its way to Europe in thirty days. He will find that this expedient of his is but the labor of Sisyphus, and is undone as soon as completed; but unlike Sisyphus his means of repeating his performance are not enduring: they will be soon exhausted, and the bulls of Wall s