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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 26 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 19 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 14 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 11 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 8 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 9, 1863., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 19, 1863., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 23, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Saulsbury or search for Saulsbury in all documents.

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Castle Thunder. --The Castle, like the rest of the city last evening, was bare of items. The only matter worth mentioning is that twenty convicts will be sent from this prison to Saulsbury to-day.
committees, and with this example It was easy to see how the country was taxed for her benefit ! He said it was as just to tax the pigs of Arkansas, or the power mills of Illinois, as that the West should be taxed to pay these fishing bounties. The debate became personal, and Mr. Powell was called a friend to traitors by Mr. Chandler, of Michigan, (a native of New England)--Mr. P. charged him with falsehood, and each declared he had no respect for the other.--It was at this juncture that Saulsbury, of Del., with admirable irony, (for such, no doubt, it was,) "appealed to the Senators, that as sons of common sires (very common!) and as brothers, they should, in the present unhappy state of affairs in which the country found itself, act as became the dignity of American Senators !" Capital ! After the pleasant debate thus aroused by assailing New England's interest, the vote was taken, and the motion to repeal the bounties failed by a tie vote--19 to 19 ! This is certainly most r