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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 355 3 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 147 23 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 137 13 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 135 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 129 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 125 13 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 108 38 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 85 7 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 84 12 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 70 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 30, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Banks or search for Banks in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 3 document sections:

elow a summary of the news they contain: The Red river expedition Settled — Banks acknowledged to be defeated and to have retreated forty miles--he has but one fd in that. The very latest intelligence from the Red river expedition, under Banks, is dated from New Orleans, the 18th inst. Its defeat by Kirby Smith is acknowl up to soften the affair at the North. There was no second day to the affair.--Banks took to his heels on the first day, and ran forty miles before stopping. We gid to be generally concealed that the battles in Louisiana have been against General Banks, as, while the enemy remained on the ground after Saturday's fight, GeneralGeneral Banks retreated forty miles. The transport Black Hawk suffered considerably, when above Alexandria, from the enemy, besides having several killed and wounded. dge. Our army was at Grand Ecore, fortifying both sides of the river. General Banks and Admiral Porter were both there. There was only five feet of water at G
The Red river campaign. The later news from the North makes the utter defeat and driving back of Banks's army the more clear and undoubted. He must have received a disastrous defeat from the brave Confederates under Kirby Smith, who were, we may suppose, inferior numerically to the invading force. We expect to hear some very cheering news from the trans-Mississippi as soon as we can derive official intelligence from that quarter. The Yankees have not "told the half." They have suppressed, evidently, a great deal that was unpleasant to Yankeedom, and that might have affected the price of gold.
8. --A special dispatch to the Tribune, dated Senatobia, April 27, says that correspondents who have seen the wounded officers at Vicksburg state that the several engagements in Louisiana resulted in a complete Federal defeat; that the Federal General Smith saved Banks's army from destruction, and that the subordinate officers are very indignant against Banks. A great conspiracy has been discovered in the Western States, and Crawford county, Ohio, has been placed under martial law. 8. --A special dispatch to the Tribune, dated Senatobia, April 27, says that correspondents who have seen the wounded officers at Vicksburg state that the several engagements in Louisiana resulted in a complete Federal defeat; that the Federal General Smith saved Banks's army from destruction, and that the subordinate officers are very indignant against Banks. A great conspiracy has been discovered in the Western States, and Crawford county, Ohio, has been placed under martial law.