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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 309 19 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 309 19 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 170 20 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 117 33 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 65 11 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 62 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 34 12 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 29 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 21, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Butler or search for Butler in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 2 document sections:

The Daily Dispatch: May 21, 1864., [Electronic resource], The War News — Grant Quiet — Another Reverse for Butler on the Southside — the battles in Louisiana, &c. (search)
The War News — Grant Quiet — Another Reverse for Butler on the Southside — the battles in Louisiana, &c. Grant seems to be quietly (with the exception of same c Parroit, Thos B. Phillips, arm off; Samuel Barnes, slightly. A Diary from Butler's Army. The following are some extracts from a diary captured last Monday i, and it was necessary for this part of the column to advance very slowly. Butler's narrow escape. At about 5 o'clock, Gen. Butler and Staff rode through theGen. Butler and Staff rode through the different regiments, and were cheered with a long and continuous cheer Gen. Butler advanced to the outpost, where I was stationed, and still forward he went, until Gen. Butler advanced to the outpost, where I was stationed, and still forward he went, until he was fired upon by a party of guerillas, who had been concealed behind a church — some 200 yards beyond the outpost. One of the General's Orderlies was taken prisoner, after being severely wounded. General Butler narrowly escaped capture. We could have taken a very pleasant game of "Yucher " (Yankee spelling) on the General
The Daily Dispatch: May 21, 1864., [Electronic resource], The War News — Grant Quiet — Another Reverse for Butler on the Southside — the battles in Louisiana, &c. (search)
othing has transpired yet to indicate that he does need men. The troops that were encountered by Butler, near Petersburg, were some troops that had recently been in North Carolina. As regards any attack that Butler may make upon Fort Darling, or the other forts south of Richmond, it will be labor in vain, for he can make no impression whatever upon them. The preposterous story that Fort Darling at the War Department, and there seems to be no reason for doubting their genuineness. How Butler whipped Beauregard's troops. The most laughable dispatch we find in the Northern papers is the following dispatch from Butler to Stanton. It was written before the whipping he got Monday: Beauregard, with a large portion of his command, was left south of the cutting of the railroad by to-day, killing and wounding many, and taking many prisoners, after a well contested fight. Butler had also telegraphed to Gen. Grant to be of good cheer; that he had whipped Beauregard at the he