Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 3, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Nassau River (Florida, United States) or search for Nassau River (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: June 3, 1864., [Electronic resource], Monumental Cenotaph in Memoryop Gen. Stonewall Jackson. (search)
its kind ever executed in the Bahamas, which is so justly celebrated for the beauty of its shell work, We would recommend those who feel any curiosity on the subject to call and inspect it. We presume that the sons of the South who side at Nassau will be glad to subscribe to the fund for its purchase and presentation to the Confederate Government Mr Mott deserves great praise for the labor spent on it, and his lasts as an artist is amply displayed. We understand that he was four months e, which is so justly celebrated for the beauty of its shell work, We would recommend those who feel any curiosity on the subject to call and inspect it. We presume that the sons of the South who side at Nassau will be glad to subscribe to the fund for its purchase and presentation to the Confederate Government Mr Mott deserves great praise for the labor spent on it, and his lasts as an artist is amply displayed. We understand that he was four months engaged on it--Nassau, (N P,) Paper,
The Daily Dispatch: June 3, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Federal Excursion into Florida. (search)
nt of the 17th Connecticut also joined us from Volusia. We captured next day a rebel messenger which important letters relating to blockade runners, the perusal of which determined the General to push on rapidly to Sunday evening, May 1st, where we camped. A detachment was ordered to advance at daylight upon the place to occur the cotton stored there. A considerable quantity was captured, and in the Lagoon, a short distance from the town, we took two schooners, blockade runners, from Nassau. They were both crammed with cotton and their decks were maded with it. These vessels, the Fannie and the Shell, were eventuality sent to Jacksonville, and the cotton take in charge of by the Treasury Agency. I took passage on one of them from Smyrna to the St Johns river, and consequently ended thus my connection with Gen Birney's raid. And of this raid I wish to say, in conclusion, that no enterprise was ever better planned and more thoroughly carried out. It has cleared the country Eas