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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 14 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1864., [Electronic resource] 13 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 11, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Dearing or search for Dearing in all documents.

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e at first seemed overwhelmed with surprise, and halted, neither advancing nor retreating. But a minute or two later another branch of our service made its appearance, which quickly determined the enemy as to the best course for him to pursue. Dearing's cavalry brigade quickly dismounted, and descending the hill with a yell, charged upon the enemy in beautiful style. This was more than they expected, (since they had encountered but a few militia in the breastworks, and had advanced nearly a mile without seeing any regulars) and they instantly wheeled their horses and started back up the hill in great confusion. Graham's battery continued to play upon them, and Dearing's men crossed the refine and ascended the opposite hill, in gallant style, their carbines keeping up a regular and most musical fusillade upon Kantz and Speare, and their rapidly retreating followers. Upon reaching the tops of the opposite hill, the enemy hoped to make a stand, as here another column, which they ha