Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 17, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Gen Butler or search for Gen Butler in all documents.

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A Northern paper on Butler. --The New York Times, writing about Butler on the Southside as a General, says: No substantial successes have been expected ofButler on the Southside as a General, says: No substantial successes have been expected of the James river expedition since it was announced that Gen. Butler was in command; for whatever else may be the capacity of that individual, it is notorious that he Gen. Butler was in command; for whatever else may be the capacity of that individual, it is notorious that he is incompetent to direct the movements of a regiment, much less an army. His rule is that of a tyrant, not of a warrior. The accounts just received from his militaegard, whom he ostentatiously announced as cut off from Richmond, has played Gen. Butler a scurry trick. He brought his army away from Petersburg by a route which ig the glowing accounts of the correspondents of the press, and the fact that Gen. Butler commands in person. In the meantime the women of Richmond, aware of his proculiarities, are removing their pianofortes and teaspoons. Recent reports state that Gen Butler lost five thousand men when Gen Heckman was engaged with the enemy.
The Daily Dispatch: June 17, 1864., [Electronic resource], The American campaign in London and Paris. (search)
e Union troops the Prussian army would now be sleeping under the sail of Denmark. Since the tempest in a teapot caused by the Treat affair, nearly three years ago, there has been nothing like the absorption of all public topics by the American news that we have witnessed during the last ten days. The intelligence just brought by the Scotta has caused a little depression to the former prospects of the Union cause; but still little doubt exists that Richmond must fall. How much Sigel and Butler may have suffered by the attacks made on their forces seems uncertain, but few believe either of them to have been over whelmed. Old Napoleon's maxim seems generally believed — that God is usually on the side of the largest battalions. Such is a faint idea of the state of public opinion here on the reception of the news of the terrific campaign now moving over Virginia. The hoaxes practiced by speculators and others in matters like the Lyons and Davis correspondence, Mallory's pretend