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clined to accede to. Upwards of four hundred prisoners, among them eighteen commissioned officers, were brought in between Friday night and Sunday night. Grant evidently designs to repeat his favorite experiment, in which he has so often signally failed, of hurling his strength against one portion of our lines, with the hstrew the fields from side to side, and the nearer our breastworks the assaulting columns came, the thicker the bodies lie. Within the last few days the army of Gen. Grant has been depleted by many thousands. On the other hand, as we have already stated, our losses have been comparatively light. The hospitals in Petersburg tccounts, it appears that Sheridan's raiders have recrossed the Pamunkey, and advanced toward the Chickahominy with the view of getting across James river to rejoin Grant. It is reported that they were met yesterday at the Cross Roads, in New Kent county, some six or eight miles below Bottom's Bridge, and that an engagement took pl
nce of their strength or weakness, Gen. Gilmore gave orders to retire to Baylor's Cross Roads to effect a junction — they were only a mile apart — and to await news from Gen. Kantz. Now, it was distinctly understood that Gen. Gillmore was to attack, so as to divert attention from Gen. Kantz attack. The cavalry rode over the rifle pits and entrenchments of the enemy, but Gen. Gillmore suffered 3,500 men, all eager for a fight, to look at similar works, and then — fell back. News from Gen. Grant--an important movement in progress — an official Dispatch from Secretary Stanton. We find the following dispatch from Secretary Stanton in the Tribune, which gives the news in brief from all quarters. The important movement referred to has developed itself in front of Petersburg: War Department, Washington, June 13-12 midnight. To Major General Dix: We have dispatches from the Army of the Potomac as late as 8 o'clock this morning. The movement was at that hour in succe
of truce to Gen. Beauregard, requesting permission to bury his dead, which was not granted. The City Council to-day held a meeting and sent a committee to Gen. Beauregard to ask his advice in regard to the removal of non-combatants. Gen. B. replied that no notice had been given by the enemy of a purpose to shell the city, but it would be prudent for those who could to leave the lower part of the city, and for the women and children to remain in cellars. Very few shells have been thrown into the city to-day. Grant's lines reach from James river across the Appomattox to within two miles of the Weldon railroad. Advices from Liberty this morning say that Hunter had been pursued through that place, and that he was retreating towards Buford's Gap in considerable disorder, and that some prisoners had been taken, and no doubt more would be. The enemy, at this writing, seem to be moving towards the Weldon railroad. Our Generals will doubtless be prepared for them.
The Daily Dispatch: June 21, 1864., [Electronic resource], Grant's campaign an acknowledged failure. (search)
Grant's campaign an acknowledged failure. We learn that a New York Herald, of the 17th inst., has been received in the city, which acknowledges that Grant's campaign against Richmond is a failure. Our impression is that Ulysses will be forced to a similar acknowledgement himself before many days. Grant's campaign an acknowledged failure. We learn that a New York Herald, of the 17th inst., has been received in the city, which acknowledges that Grant's campaign against Richmond is a failure. Our impression is that Ulysses will be forced to a similar acknowledgement himself before many days.
e support of the Radicals in 1860? They made him President, and because they like a little more liberty of speech and of the press — a little more honesty and consistency — they, too, are called Copperhead. In calling names, in partisan abuse, the Times is entitled to-day to the honors of being at the head of the profession. If the Radicals are Copperheads, pray what are they who coalesced and cohabited with these Radicals in making Mr. Lincoln President? The New York Sun, in speculating upon the Presidential question, says: "The importance of the nomination depends entirely on the events that may transpire during the next three or four months. If Gen. Grant is successful, he will be the next President, if he chooses, other candidates to the contrary notwithstanding. Should he fall, contrary to all reasonable expectation, Fremont will then loom up in large proportions, and the real contest will be between him and the representative of the Conservative Wat Democracy. "