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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 506 506 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 279 279 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 141 141 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 55 55 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 32 32 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 25, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

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of our Lieutenant General with patience. He has a great task before him. He might possibly carry the rebel works by storm. He names and describes some twenty or thirty forts, some of the walls of which are from 80 to 90 feet thick, and all of them quite impregnable. Mr Harris gets into the cotton question, and shows how we make our explosives: The great scarcity of saltpetre, and the difficulty of obtaining it from abroad, has excited among the rebel leaders no little alarm. In October last the Ordnance Department determined to make some experiments with gun cotton. A quantity was manufactured and subjected to various tests, which proved quite satisfactory. A charge equal to one ounce and a half of powder was placed in an eight inch mortar with a 64 pound shot, which, on being fired, gave a range of 192 feet, which exceeds by several feet the range obtained from two ounces of the best cylinder powder. For another test a quantity of the cotton equal to two drachms was p