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sened his military ardor, as his victories will show. I will close by giving you a Yankee letter as a sample of what the people "down to hum" think of Grant, Gen Lee, and matters generally. Boston, June 17, 1864. Dear Daniel: This is a public day in Boston. The streets are full of people. It seems a new route iervice has expired. I thought Gen Grant might be in Richmond by the 4th of July, but the "Cold Harbor" and "Wilderness" prevent his going ahead very fast, as Gen Lee is ready at any spot, and a fight can be found with him by going where he is ready to receive company. Richmond is strong, and Lee is smart, and so is Gen GrLee is smart, and so is Gen Grant. Nothing of interest transpiring in front Very little cannonading, and scarcely any picket firing. X. Reports from Petersburg. It was reported in Petersburg on Wednesday that a large number of Wilson's raiders had fallen into our hands, and this was repeated by prisoners who were brought in at half-past 11 o'clock
it was with perils, and took the long and circuitous route by the Forge Bridge, and then by way of Charles City Court-House to James river. The writer says that Gen Lee did not molest Grant on his march, although he was perfectly aware of the progress of that movement from day to day, simply because the most formidable preparatioeceive him on the Southside, and he preferred that he should go there. According to this correspondent, Grant manœuvered throughout the whole movement precisely as Lee wished, and did nothing which Lee did not compel him to do. A bold statement like this cannot fall to have its influence in arousing the Yankees to a suspicion thatLee did not compel him to do. A bold statement like this cannot fall to have its influence in arousing the Yankees to a suspicion that the truth has not been told them with respect to Grant; and that while they have ghastly evidence every hour of the day of the valor of the foe he is expected to subdue, he has made no progress in taking Richmond and crushing the rebellion. In the meantime gold — that most suspicious of all things, natural or artificial — ref