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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 259 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 202 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 182 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 148 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 88 0 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 54 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 46 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 40 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 32 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 15 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 5, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for George Thompson or search for George Thompson in all documents.

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ly stole all the flour we had and carried it off. If no one but Averill had come we would have done pretty well. He was here a day or two before the others, and did not seem inclined to take advantage of our defenceless condition; but as soon as Crook, Hunter, and Duffee came the work of destruction commenced. * * * When the bridge was burnt the wind was very high and set directly up the street, so that the small houses near the bridge caught immediately; then the large lumber house of George Thompson, the Hob house, Mrs. Johnston's, and the houses where Mr. Johnston's, and the houses where Mr. Chandler and Dr. Scott lived. Others caught, but were put out. We are much indebted to Averill's men for the promptitude with which they assisted in extinguishing the fire and helping those who had to move." From this letter, it appears that Averill's troops are somewhat less brutal in their instincts than the generality of Yankee soldiers, and, on the principle of giving the devil his