Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 8, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Hunter or search for Hunter in all documents.

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Gen. Grant had not crossed over to the southside of the James river. If these measures prove successful, it is not too much to say that they will absolutely prevent the capture of Richmond at this time. They are measures directed against Gen. Hunter, towards the defence of Lynchburg, and towards the defence and preservation, and the continued availability of three lines of railroad running from Richmond — namely, the one to Danville and Columbia, in South Carolina, (which, by way of Burke was sent to him by the Burkesville Railroad, the distance from Richmond being 121 miles. It is very strongly fortified, and although it might be taken by a well appointed force of fifty-thousand troops, it certainly cannot be by the troops under Hunter and Pope. It is understood at Richmond that large detachments of Gen. Lee's army have been sent to certain points on the Danville Railroad in order to defeat any attempt to destroy it; and it is certain that both that road and the Virginia Centr
Prisoners from the Valley. --Sixty Yankees, including three Captains, were brought here Sunday evening on the Orange train. They belonged to Northwestern Virginia regiments in Hunter's army, and say that their terms of service had expired, and they were making their was home, when they were pounced upon by McNiel and his gallant rangers near Martinsburg. They were sent on to join their brethren in iniquity in Georgia. Mosby sent on another squad of cerulean abdomens last night, which he picked up in his forty upon the Baltimore and Ohio railroad last Monday. They numbered 68, among them one Captain and two Lieutenants.--Lynchburg Republican, 5th.
Gen. Hunter. The atrocities of this man in the Valley have cast Butler into the shade. The laurels of "the Beast" can no longer be attached exclusively to his brow. Hunter is the savage of the Northern hordes. He has, happily, the redeeming virtue of courage, and will no doubt give on soldiers a future opportunity of being even with him. If he gets off then as successfully as now, the fault will be our own. Gen. Hunter. The atrocities of this man in the Valley have cast Butler into the shade. The laurels of "the Beast" can no longer be attached exclusively to his brow. Hunter is the savage of the Northern hordes. He has, happily, the redeeming virtue of courage, and will no doubt give on soldiers a future opportunity of being even with him. If he gets off then as successfully as now, the fault will be our own.