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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 166 56 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 114 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 98 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 91 9 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 78 2 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 77 7 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 58 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 45 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 23, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Hardee or search for Hardee in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

time previous to the removal of Johnston the editor attempted to ridicule his movements. When the President relieved him of command, determined not to be pleased, he found fault with the President for his appointment of Hood as his successor. "Hardee had been overslaughed." But it turns out that Hardee had already refused to take command of the army. This made it necessary for Jomini — I mean the "military editor"--to change his plan of assault. Whereupon he suggested that there was a propeHardee had already refused to take command of the army. This made it necessary for Jomini — I mean the "military editor"--to change his plan of assault. Whereupon he suggested that there was a proper man not far distant from Petersburg to whom the command should have been committed, and charged the President with being governed by "a malignant jealously unparalleled outside of the bottomless pit." In these constant changes of position the aforesaid editor violates one of the oldest maxims of the military art: He exposes his rear and flanks to assault. I am surprised that one who acts himself up as a teacher of the art, who aspires to instruct the President, and to point out to our Ge
ep backwards Subsequently, two corps were withdrawn to this side of the river, to defend the crossings on either wing, should any attempt be made to that end, and Hardee was left two miles in front on the other side to defend the railroad bridge, and hold the enemy in check on our centre. Hardee's line extended, perhaps, three orHardee's line extended, perhaps, three or four miles, and yesterday (Saturday) heavy skirmishing ensued. The Federal advanced and drove in our pickets in front of the division of Gan. French, but reinforcements being sent forward the enemy were in turn driven back nearly to their works, and our line was re-established. Demonstrations were likewise made on our right andted by Gen. Johnston. The fact, however, became evident yesterday that the commander in chief had determined to withdraw his forces still further to the rear. Gen. Hardee, during the night, retreated to the south side of the Chattahoochee, burning the bridge behind him, and this morning we are all in line of battle two miles or m