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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 308 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 44 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 32 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 26 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 23 13 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 23, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) or search for Chattahoochee River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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he intention, no doubt, of striking the Atlanta and West Point railroad. Red. Jackson started out in pursuit of them, and they were overtaken and driven back across the river by Gen. Frank Armstrong, of Jackson's division, and Moore's bridge burned. Since that time they have remained pretty quiet. They evidently have a hankering after the West Point road, however, and we may catch them there yet. How Gen Johnston crossed the Chattahoochee. The public, who believed that the Chattahoochee river was the point at which Gen. Johnston was to make a stand against Sherman, ill read with interest the following account of his crossing that river, given ( July 10th) by the Savannah Republican's correspondent with the Army of Tennessee. He dates from "Behind the Chattahoochee," and says: Events have taken place within the last twenty-four hours which have disturbed the equilibrium of everybody — put the army to pondering and fermented Atlanta until it is absolutely effervescing