hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 1,463 127 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,378 372 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 810 42 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 606 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 565 25 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 473 17 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 373 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 372 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 232 78 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 28, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) or search for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

confirmed, and will prove a serious blow to the enemy's operations in Georgia. McPherson was the ruling adviser with Sherman, as he had been with Grant, and was possessed of great caution and much ability. He is the man who has led all the flank movements which have resulted in the flanking of Gen. Johnston from Dalton back to the rear of the Chattahoochee river. It was in making a flank movement on East Point — which, had it been successful, would have insured the isolation and siege of Atlanta — that he was himself struck in the flank by Hardee and lost his life. There is no man in Sherman's army who approaches him as a commander except Thomas, who though successful as a fighting General, has no reputation as a strategist. The Valley. There is nothing further from the Valley, except the report that we get through Northern papers that Gen. Averill, notorious as a raider and spoon thief in Western Virginia, was killed in the recent Confederate victory by Gen. Early. P
Partien from Martinsburg report that the Confederates hurled a large force upon Gen Averill, capturing his artillery and a portion of his cavalry. It is reported that Major Gen Averill and Brig Gen Mulligan were killed. From Georgia. After referring to the telegraphic reports from Georgia, the Gazette say: All that we really know is that the fighting has been very heavy; that the losses have been severe on both sides, and that Gen Sherman, up to Saturday last, did not occupy Atlanta. In losing Gen McPherson, Gen Sherman has lost his best officer, and it is doubtful whether there now remains in the Army of Tennessee a commander who is capable of adequately filling his place. Dispatches from Gen Sherman have been received, in which he estimates his losses in the battle of Friday at 2,000 killed and wounded, and that of the enemy at 7,000. Financial. Secretary Fessenden has issued proposals for a popular loan of $200,000,000, bearing 7.80 per cent inte