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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 17 17 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 11, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 11, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for July 13th, 1864 AD or search for July 13th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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Russell on the Situation. [From the London Army and Navy Gazette, July 13, 1864.] Lieutenant-General Ulysses Grant seems to us to be in what he would most probably term, in his own nervous diction, "a very tight place." It is quite true that in his present position he must give much anxiety to the enemy, and that he menaces the Confederate capital with a greater danger than any the tenacious and valiant Southerners have yet had to encounter from Federal foes; but it is scarcely possible that he can retain that position under the fire of the July and August sun; and as yet any attempt to improve it by advancing has not been attended with encouraging results. As a line is length without breadth, and as a circle is bounded by a line, General Grant may maintain that he has not departed from his pledge to fight out the possession of Richmond "on this line" by moving round the capital, but it is difficult to perceive what advantage he has gained by approaching it now from the south si