Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 11, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Ulysses Grant or search for Ulysses Grant in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 4 document sections:

ent to Choctaw Bluff. --That portion in Fort Gaines is, by this disgraceful surrender, handed over to the enemy. Our informant, who gives us these particulars, is at a loss to account for Anderson's conduct, as in the army he was considered an officer of bravery and honor. In Petersburg, yesterday, there was nothing new. There was no shelling of consequence. The explosion which occurred on Tuesday was within the enemy's lines, on the City Point road, and was caused probably by some of Grant's mining material being unintentionally let off. The rumored disaster to General McCausland's command was unfounded. He has returned to Romney, having accomplished what he was sent for. He was ordered to obtain one hundred thousand dollars in gold as a ransom for Chambersburg, (in retaliation for the property destroyed by Hunter in the Valley during his raid), or in default of that to burn the town. The gold was not paid, and the town was fired--two hundred and fifty-four houses being
eating on Winchester. Before leaving Hagerstown the rebels arrested and carried off two prominent Union citizens. General Sheridan has been temporarily placed in command of the defences of Washington, the Middle Department, including Maryland, and the Department of the Shenandoah. General Kelly reports, on the authority of a scout, that General Averill overtook the rebels at Moorefield on Sunday, attacked them, and captured all their artillery and five hundred prisoners. From Grant's army. A dispatch from the Army of the Potomac states that the rebels exploded a mine under one of our works in front of Petersburg on Friday, but succeeded in doing very little damage. The rebels managed their mining operations very badly, and the explosion took place forty yards in front of our works. They attempted an assault afterwards, but were repulsed with considerable loss. Both armies are engaged in strengthening their defensive works. A few days since fifty rebel deser
ssell on the Situation. [From the London Army and Navy Gazette, July 13, 1864.] Lieutenant-General Ulysses Grant seems to us to be in what he would most probably term, in his own nervous diction, uraging results. As a line is length without breadth, and as a circle is bounded by a line, General Grant may maintain that he has not departed from his pledge to fight out the possession of Richmon with the view of getting his corps across the James river to aid the cavalry force belonging to Grant's army. The next great Federal army, on which the hopes of the North have so long been fixed, p attainment of their object now, after all their losses in money and men; nor does it look as if Grant were going to achieve it.--Even if Richmond fell, the South would fight long and desperately. But Petersburg bars the way, and Grant is still sitting in front of the Confederate earthworks whittling sticks, as is his wont, filling the hospitals with the living, and fattening the rank soil with
Negro troops. The Yankee journals are unanimous in denouncing the negro troops for their cowardice at Petersburg, and Grant for putting them in front. Some of them qualify their denunciation of Grant by accusing Lincoln, in complaisance to whom, they say, the experiment was made; but they all agree that the duty upon which the negroes were ordered was such as demanded the service of the bravest and most thoroughly-tried regiments in the whole army, and that the most indifferent and leastGrant by accusing Lincoln, in complaisance to whom, they say, the experiment was made; but they all agree that the duty upon which the negroes were ordered was such as demanded the service of the bravest and most thoroughly-tried regiments in the whole army, and that the most indifferent and least experienced were thrust upon it. So, it seems, this is all that the poor negro gets from his new masters. He is first pushed forward upon the most dangerous service that can possibly be required of a soldier — he takes the bullets and bayonets which his better disciplined white comrades should receive — he acts as a living rampart to shield them from danger — and when he is compelled, by a fire which no troops on earth could stand, to break and run, he gets nothing but curses and jeers in ret<