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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 110 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 86 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 72 18 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 66 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 62 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 62 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 46 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 43 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 22, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 1 document section:

Why Chambersburg was burnt. --This act is thus explained in a letter from Maryland to the New York Herald: "Just before leaving Williamsport, General Early made some public remarks in regard to the burning of Chambersburg which are of interest. He said that he ordered one hundred thousand dollars in gold to be demandeChambersburg which are of interest. He said that he ordered one hundred thousand dollars in gold to be demanded of the town; and that if the demand was not complied with in three hours the town was to be burned; that the sum of money demanded was to reimburse Andrew Hunter, William Lucas, E. J. Lee and Hon. Alexander R. Boteler for their losses, caused in the destruction of their property by order of General Hunter, and that he felt perfemarks in a calm, firm manner. In a private conversation, he said that no man more than himself deprecated the necessity of such an act as the one committed at Chambersburg, but that he sanctioned it, believing he was only doing his duty to those people who had suffered by General Hunter's orders; and again, because he believed th